AIP Chicken Korma

Original Recipe here. You can figure out the servings for yourself, this is what I usually eat as one.

A recipe that I didn’t make, Dear Reader, how novel. Rare at this stage, but Jack is ever curious, or bored rather. I went hunting recipes and though I know about the AIP diet, I know about most diets both practical and snake oil, I haven’t read all that extensively about it. I intersect most dietary plans with my own, but as some of the AIP is forbidden to me, too much really, and cutting out more to match it would be absurd and pointless, for me you understand, no disrespect to the diet, which seems useful to those who require it, safe too which is essential. But we have the no nightshades, and the ever ubiquitous nomato sauce, which I don’t care for all that much, it just feels dull, in common. Will I have further AIP friendly recipes? Maybe, I may already have, but to be truthful I have tagged recipes, taking painstaking hours to help people who diets I don’t follow, taken such care as to make no mistakes and haven’t heard a word of thanks. I’m no longer pushing or punishing myself like that for the blog, as I often said, Dear Reader, what good I do now will suffice, I’ve more than paid my debt of gratitude.

Still, I like the anti-inflammatory aspect of this recipe. With the ever fluctuating weather my histamine intolerance is rearing up unpredictably, I counter it as best I can, add more to those counters I use regularly when this happens and generally ride out the storm. You can see it’s a fairly basic recipe, I have tweaked the preparation to line up more with my own methods, but this doesn’t change the recipe in any meaningful way. I skipped the cauliflower rice, I’m currently fighting my apathy toward cauliflower in my own way, I still prefer broccoli, but variations keep a diet interesting. It’s a reduced, not thickened, sauce, since it’s in a pot it won’t reduce greatly, you could do it in the pan, but I don’t know if cooking the onions too much would ruin the AIP safeness. The spices are a curt down curry powder, it’s fairly salty, but that cuts through the turmeric, to works well enough and doesn’t feel too plain. I left off the cilantro because I can’t seem to tolerate it. I have a lot of curry recipes, they’re just so adaptable, and may have many similar to this, but as it was AIP and I was tired of the usual I gave it a whirl and it was fine. Nothing to vow you, but as you know, Dear Reader, any recipe made exclusively¬†for a free-from diet often needs us to be accepting of its limits.

So, I will be searching around sometime, depending on the weather, if it’s fine then it’s a gulp and run kind of day, if it’s dreary it’s a brooding and planning day, not a given it’ll produce recipes, but the chances are better. If you are on an AIP diet then I’ll tag any recipes from here on out and if you know of any recipes here that are suitable please let me know in the respective comment section and I’ll update the tag. Until later then, Dear Reader, take care and wish for finer weather.

Ingredients

2 Chicken Breasts, Chopped
160ml Coconut Cream
1/2 Yellow Onion, Chopped Fine
2 Cloves Garlic, Minced
2 Tbsp (30ml) Olive Oil
1 Tsp Honey or Maple Syrup

Spice Blend:

2 Tsp Ground Turmeric
1 Tsp Sea Salt
1 Tsp Ground Ginger
1/2 Tsp Ground Cinnamon

Optional: Cilantro leaves, to garnish.

Method

1. Heat Olive Oil in a pan and when hot add Onion and Garlic, mix and cover. Let cook for 5-10 minutes, on a medium heat, or until soft.

2. Add Spice Blend and add Chicken then stir together and cook for 5 minutes.

3. Add Coconut Milk and stir. Then let simmer and cook covered for 10 minutes, uncover, add the Honey and cook for a further 10 minutes to reduce and thicken the sauce slightly.

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Cashew Jasmine Rice Pilaf

I’m cleaning up some of my recipes pages, dear reader and splitting off the ones that have become too crowded. If possible I’ll update these with photos in the future, but for now this will have to do. I’ll schedule these so they won’t overrun the site.

Ingredients

1/2 Cup of Jasmine Rice
250ml Water
1 Tbsp Butter
1 Clove of Garlic, Minced
1/8 Tsp Turmeric
1/8 Tsp Cumin
1/8 Tsp Salt
1/16 Tsp Cinnamon
1 Bay Leaf
20g Cashews, Chopped
1 Tbsp Dried Fruit (Raisins etc)

Optional: Cilantro to Serve

Method

1. Cook Butter, Cumin, Turmeric, Cinnamon, Garlic in a pot on a medium-low heat for 2 minutes.

2. Stir in Rice, turn to medium and cook for 2-4 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking. Add Water, Salt, Fruit, Cashews and the Bay Leaf and stir up the Rice. Bring to the boil, then turn the heat down to medium (3 on hob) cover and let it cook for about 12 minutes.

3. After the 12 minutes is up, remove it from the heat. Let it stand for another 10 minutes or so. After 10 minutes, lift the lid, remove the Bay Leaf and take a fork and fluff the Rice.

Ginger Jasmine Rice

I’m cleaning up some of my recipes pages, dear reader and splitting off the ones that have become too crowded. If possible I’ll update these with photos in the future, but for now this will have to do. I’ll schedule these so they won’t overrun the site.

Ingredients

1/2 Cup of Jasmine Rice
250ml Water and 1/3 of a Chicken Stock Cube
1/2 Tbsp Butter
1/2 Tbsp Olive Oil
2 Cloves of Garlic, Minced
1 1/2 Tbsp Grated Fresh Ginger
Pinch Salt

Optional: Add 1 Tbsp Fresh, Chopped Cilantro just before serving.

Method

1. Heat Olive Oil and Butter in a pot on a medium heat. When Butter has melted add the Garlic and Ginger and cook for a minute or so.

2. Stir in Rice and Chicken Stock, stir and bring to the boil, then turn the heat down to medium (3 on hob) cover and let it cook for about 12 minutes.

3. After the 12 minutes is up, remove it from the heat. Let it stand for another 10 minutes or so. After 10 minutes, lift the lid and take a fork and fluff the Rice.

Coriander Wholegrain Basmati Rice

I’m cleaning up some of my recipes pages, dear reader and splitting off the ones that have become too crowded. If possible I’ll update these with photos in the future, but for now this will have to do. I’ll schedule these so they won’t overrun the site.

Ingredients

1/2 Cup of Wholegrain Basmati Rice
250ml Water
1/8 Small Yellow Onion, Chopped
1/2 Tsp Olive Oil
1/2 Tsp Ground Coriander
Salt and Black Pepper to Taste
1/2 Tbsp Fresh Cilantro, Chopped Fine

Method

1. Add the Olive Oil and Onion to the pot and cook for 5 minutes on a medium heat.

2. Add the Water, Coriander, Salt, Black Pepper and Rice the pot. Put the pan on high heat. Wait till the water boils and starts bubbling then turn the heat down to medium (3 on hob) cover and let it just sit there for 20 minutes.

3. After the 20 minutes is up, turn off the heat. Let it stand for another 10 minutes or so. After 10 minutes, lift the lid, add the Fresh Coriander and then take a fork and fluff the Rice.

Herb Butter

I just had enough sage.

Original can be found here. You know this recipe, you’ve seen it dozens of times, there’s nothing new here, it’s just that I’ve never had a reason to make it before. Herb butter sounds great, but I don’t often use better when coking, at least not when I’m using herbs. But, I figured out a use. My mother makes stuffing and uses fresh sage, but often the sage isn’t ready when she’s making it, so since she fries her onions in butter I thought this would be an ideal solution. I did tweak it one way as you can see below. You’d be best to use freshly picked herbs, the smell of the fresh sage is intense, even for a older plant. I hate to make something like this without reason, last year I froze herbs in olive oil and struggled to use them, I think a fair few went into the bin, this is ideal as they’ll be used up fairly quickly. If you want really fast stuffing you can also blitz the onions and freeze them the same way. A quickie, but handy to know. See you later, dear reader.

Already popped and bagged.

Ingredients

110g Butter, Softened
1/4 Fresh Herbs, Chopped
1/2 Tsp Sea Salt
1/2 Tsp Freshly Ground Black Pepper

Can be frozen.

Method

1. Add everything to a bowl and stir together until Herbs have been evenly distributed throughout the butter. Scoop in a container, roll into a clingfilm log or fill into ice-cube trays.