Quinoa Flour Savoury Waffles

 photo WP_20170419_002_e_zpsxq7i5px4.jpgI’ve yet to try the novelty plates.

Ah, dear reader, welcome to Jack’s Mansion of Waffles! That’s all the waffle jokes I’ve got. Yeah, back with yet another flour and another couple of waffles. I had hoped that these might have shared the crustiness of my Quinoa Bread, but sadly no crust. I will try frying them in butter eventually just to see how well they crunch up, either that or toast them. So, like with most promising recipes the future will hold wonder whilst the present just holds, well, waffles. Good waffles. I’ve had no troubles with stuck waffle so far, plenty of oil in the batter seems to work really well. These are similar to the previous recipes, the difference here is that these have less of a crispy texture and more of a skin, but inside they’re absurdly fluffy. It seems to be the most amazing property of quinoa flour when used with flaxseed and a lot of liquid. The batter here will be very runny, much moreso than waffle batter usually is. More of what a quinoa crepe batter would be. There’s a future recipe. I didn’t bother with sugar, I wanted these for sandwiches and you can always add sweetness afterwards, though sugar, white seems best, in the batter does help the waffles crisp up more. Another recipe that proves you can do without a lot of extra additions when using free-from flours, assuming you have the knowledge to use them or the patience to learn. See you again soon, dear reader.

 photo WP_20170419_004_e_zpskiqinfac.jpgI mostly use these as change up from bread.

Ingredients

150ml Water
100g Quinoa Flour
1 Large Eggs (70g to 75g in shell)
50ml Olive Oil
10g Ground Flaxseed
1/2 Tsp Baking Powder
Pinch of Salt

Makes four waffles.
Can be frozen.

Method

1. Beat Eggs, Water, Olive Oil and Salt until frothy using a whisk.

2. Add in Flour, Flaxseed and Baking Powder then whisk until a smooth, very runny batter has been formed. Rest for five minutes.

3. Turn on Waffle Iron. and when heated add enough Batter to warmed Waffle Iron to fill the plates, close and cook for 7-10 minutes until waffles are golden brown and the bottom is crisp. Remove with a rubber spatula and let cool for a few minutes, Waffles will soften slightly as they cool. Repeat until batter is used up.

Amaranth, Buckwheat and Quinoa

 photo WP_20170409_002_e_zpsqdlclmsx.jpgA “Clearing Out The Freezer” Dinner.

Dear r-reader, is it r-really you? It’s been millennia since we last…what? You sure? It has felt like an eternity getting through these recipes. I wanted to show how easy it is to use these seeds and in trying to prove it I’ve driven myself sightly mad, but it’s finally finished. I hope that all of you out there struggling to find new ideas for weekly meals will look at these and at least consider adding one, or all, of these seeds to your diets. They’re really worthwhile. I complain because these recipes are really basic and I needed to space them out and try them properly. I made it and still have some in date buckwheat groats. The first two recipes had a texture very similar to just amaranth, but today’s triple combo has a texture split down the middle. A soft, thick porridge combines with individual seeds firmness. It’s unusual, strangely like a crumbly porridge. An odd description, but apt. I did go for a nut butter option, but you can do whatever you like with the basic version. If all else you’ll find unique, interesting recipes here, whether people will try them is uncertain, but I like the fact that I can make this diet work. Okay, that’s all for today. No garden post to pester you with today as the promised weekend sunshine has vanished. I’m off to read and complain about the lack of spinach being planted. I don’t even eat it, but I want to grow it! Until later.

Ingredients

170ml Water
20g Amaranth
20g White Quinoa
15g Raw Buckwheat Groats
Olive Oil

Method

1. Put the Quinoa in a fine mesh sieve and rinse with cold water.

2. Add a little Olive Oil to the pot and heat. Add the Quinoa and cook until dried. Then add in the Amaranth, Buckwheat and Water. Bring to boil, reduce to a medium heat cover and cook for 15 minutes.

4. After the 15 minutes is up, turn off the heat. Let it stand for another 5 minutes. After 5 minutes, lift the lid and take a fork and fluff.

Variations

Peanut Butter: Cook as normal. While cooking mix together 1 Tbsp Peanut Butter Butter, 1/2 Tbsp Olive Oil, 2 Cloves Garlic, Grated, a Pinch Sea Salt and Black Pepper until a smooth Paste is formed. Stir Paste into Amaranth, Buckwheat and Quinoa just before serving.

Quinoa and Buckwheat

 photo WP_20170406_001_e_zpsjsfyenkq.jpgDéjà vu.

That’s it right? All three seeds, Buckwheat, Quinoa and Amaranth have been combined in various ways. Well, I guess a triple cook is possible…Maybe. I’ll see. So, today the side is different as instead of the soft textured amaranth we’ve got two seeds that remain mostly firm and tasteless. That’s just gravy, you see what I did there? Yeah, yeah, anyway this is a perfect plain side to go with any intensely flavoured meal. Adding the stock and toasting the buckwheat helps take away the extreme blandness that these seeds taste of when cooked as is. I don’t really have much to add here, dear reader, there’s not much here just the measurements and techniques needed to cook this perfectly. Well, if you try it let me know. Take care.

Ingredients

25g White Quinoa
25g Raw Buckwheat Groats
165ml Boiling Water
1/3 Stock Chicken Cube (If water used is 1/3 of water needed for stock then use 1/3 of a stock cube. If water used if 1/2 of water needed for stock then use 1/2 of a stock cube etc)
Olive Oil

Method

1. Put the Quinoa in a fine mesh sieve and rinse with cold water. Set aside. Add Stock Cube to boiling water and set aside.

2. Add the Buckwheat Groats to the pot with a drizzle of Olive Oil and then toast on a medium heat until fragrant, lightly golden and just starting to pop. Add the Quinoa and cook until dry.

3. Pour Stock into the pot and bring to boil, reduce to a medium heat, cover and cook for 15 minutes.

4. After the 15 minutes is up remove from the heat. Let it stand for another 5 minutes. After 5 minutes, lift the lid and take a fork and fluff the Quinoa and Buckwheat.

Quinoa and Amaranth

2017 Update: Due to a problem with Photobucket, see here, there will be a lot of recipes without photos. I will be slowly redoing the recipe pages, as best I can, but many other posts will be impossible to replace. I’m doing this in my own time, while continuing to update the blog with new recipes and posts. If you’d like to donate, any amount appreciated, you can do so here. The site will always be free, the recipes will never be locked behind a paywall, but this is a lot of additional work. I’m not demanding or begging, just putting it there so if you feel like repaying my hard work you have that option. I don’t make any money from the site, all that I do here is to help others, I couldn’t charge for that.

Not only a new recipe, but it already has variations!

I just realised that my Quinoa recipe was in dire need of editing. It’s been sorted now, sorry to anyone that tried it and had trouble. So, again, I’m back with a basic recipe, but you know what? I’ve found that often when these seeds, not grains, not pseudo-grains, are being sold they can often be listed with erroneous recipes on how best to prepare them, if they include a recipe at all. You’re flat out of luck if you’d like a little flair with your new side. That’s why I’m here, I was caught time and time again and one day decided I couldn’t do any worse. Think of these as the four Mother Seeds, like the sauces, you know?…Just Google it. You have Amaranth, Pigweed, The seed of the Aztecs, blah blah blah, you’ve heard it countless time and probably haven’t seen much use for it outside of porridge. I have you more than covered. No, no need to thank me. Wait, do, do thank me! I’m just wonderful, right? So humble, modest too. Then there’s Buckwheat, oh, you delight, seed of my heart. Perfection, to me at least. Then there’s Kaniwa…moving on. And finally Quinoa. You might be a bit dull, but you’ve stood me well in time, my old seed. I think no healthy free-from diet can be without a few of these seeds regularly. Just check the links and tags because if you think I’m linking to all those recipe you’re a sanguine lunkhead.

What’s the worth in listing a recipe this simple? Because chances are you don’t know how to cook these seeds singularly never mind together. I can only guess at this, perhaps you’re all, everyone one of you, well informed, but secretive, but I don’t often see them used, never to the absurd extent I’ve tried them. I’ve been on a restricted diet so long that it no longer feels that way. It takes so much effort, graft and willingness to get to here and that’s why I’m sharing the fruits of my labours. Quinoa and Amaranth go together really easily because they share a cooking time The water and weight was different for each, but they cooked perfectly. The basic side is very bland, hence the addition of a variation below. What you end up with here is a slightly differently textured amaranth. This is more on the side of homogeneity rather than the individual  distinct grains of quinoa. I like this. Mix it up with some nut or seed butter, some additional flavours and you’ve got a side that you can enjoy in place of mashed vegetables. I’ll just say that you should give these seeds a chance, they might be just what your diet needs. Oh, about the peanut butter and cranberry: You’d eat a peanut butter and jelly sandwich right? That’s what this is, just savoury. So good with sweet potato and broccoli. Okay, dear reader, I’ll leave you now, to go and lament my lack of compost on this fine day, but to also marvel at my started seeds. Until later.

Ingredients

160ml Water
25g White Quinoa
30g Amaranth
Olive Oil

Method

1. Put the Quinoa in a fine mesh sieve and rinse with cold water.

2. Add a little Olive Oil to the pot and heat. Add the Quinoa and cook until dried. Then add in the Amaranth and Water. Bring to boil, reduce to a medium heat, cover and cook for 15 minutes.

4. After the 15 minutes is up, remove from the heat. Let it stand for another 5 minutes. After 5 minutes, lift the lid and take a fork and fluff.

Variations

Peanut Butter and Cranberry: Cook as normal. While cooking mix together: 1 Tbsp Cranberry Sauce, 1 Tbsp Peanut Butter, 1/2 Tbsp Olive Oil, a Pinch Sea Salt and Black Pepper until a smooth Paste is formed. Stir Paste into Quinoa and Amaranth just before serving.

French Toast

2017 Update: Due to a problem with Photobucket, see here, there will be a lot of recipes without photos. I will be slowly redoing the recipe pages, as best I can, but many other posts will be impossible to replace. I’m doing this in my own time, while continuing to update the blog with new recipes and posts. If you’d like to donate, any amount appreciated, you can do so here. The site will always be free, the recipes will never be locked behind a paywall, but this is a lot of additional work. I’m not demanding or begging, just putting it there so if you feel like repaying my hard work you have that option. I don’t make any money from the site, all that I do here is to help others, I couldn’t charge for that.

The things I do for love – Courage The Cowardly Dog

Ah, French Toast, me ole chum, me pal, eh, cocky? Yeah, I had French Toast a total of…one time and it was a soggy mess. I didn’t make it that time, so there’s that. So, you might ask, sceptical reader, why am I making it now? Why? You ask why? Because I could! Hah! Take that…Actually, take this recipe. You see, with my Quinoa Bread being pretty popular and making some wonderful fried bread, I thought I’d see if it would work as a base for French Toast, or Eggy Bread or whatever other name you’d rather. Well, from what I can tell it did work, but like I say, I’m no great expert at French Toast Identification, still it seems to match up with what it’s supposed to be. The texture of the quinoa bread is strong and springy so I had hoped it’d also be absorbent, it was, it sucked up all the Egg mixture between the two slices. It fried up nice and crispy on the outside, not quite as hard as the fried bread is, more of a nicely toasted feel. the inside was spongy, maybe a little more solid than it should have been, I’m, again, not sure. It tasted nice enough, not wet or soggy at all. I’m just not a huge fan of French Toast, but I wanted to see how far I can push this bread. I can only vouch for my own bread, I have tried frying other Gluten Free Breads and they ranged from meh to something unholy. So your mileage may vary depending on the bread used. This is just enough for two large slices of bread, make them thick ones to help them hold together, this didn’t break at all when fried. Not much else to say on this really. In plenty of time for Valentine’s Day, nothing says love like buttery sugary bread.

So that’s that. Go out and make French Toast!

Ingredients

1 Large Egg, Lightly Beaten
60ml Milk
1 Tbsp Butter
2 Slices Bread
Maple Syrup to Serve

Optional: Fresh Berries to serve.

Method

1. Add the Egg and Milk to a shallow bowl and whisk together until completely combined.

2. Melt the Butter in a pan over a medium-high heat, being careful not to let it burn. Soak the Bread in the Egg mixture, leaving for a minute to soak up and then flip and repeat for the other side. Add to the pan and fry until golden brown and then flip and cook the other side. The exterior of the Bread should be firm to the touch, whilst the inside should be soft and springy.

3. Place French Toast onto a plate and drizzle with Maple Syrup. Top with Fresh Berries if desired.

Baking a Better Quinoa Flour Bread

 photo IMGP3943_e_zpsova7t6pc.jpgYou hear that? It’s the sound of windows being opened.

I’ve gone back to my old experiment: Quinoa Flour Bread, not a loaf made with a smattering of quinoa flour and a mix of other flours, no, almost all quinoa with just a little flax. Nothing bothers me more than seeing a recipe named after a flour that barely constitutes a fraction of the bread. I suppose it’s a personal prejudice due to the fact I can’t use added starches (Like arrowroot or tapioca) so when I read a recipe with a name like “X-Flour Bread” I’m invariably disappointed. So I’m going to do what I always do, take it into my own hands and do what I can. This is a simple recipe, but considering it works I think that’s just fine.

 photo IMGP3944_e_zpskxdyksyc.jpgFive minutes out of the oven and cut with a steak knife. Not bad…

So as far as changes go we’ve upped the eggs, now it’s two large eggs for binding and lightness and we’ve got flaxseed to stabilize the loaf. I had a moment of panic when I added all the water without thinking, thankfully after resting it had been adsorbed by the flax and quinoa. I think this was part of the reason the bread is so light, yet not at all soggy or dense. Flax alone wouldn’t give you the kind of rise the eggs would and eggs alone wouldn’t give you the kind of hold that flax would. Flax absorbs water and it can help when a loaf is in need of moisture yet the flour being used can’t hold enough. This is the same idea as most of my other breads, but each flour needs a tweak to help it along. It’s partly guess work and partly experience.

 photo IMGP3947_e_zpslnt06wqa.jpgThen cut in half. That’s pretty decent, right?

So, once I got it in the tin and it was baking I noticed something strange. The colour. It’s yellow, the last flour I had was brown when baked. It was also bitter whereas this isn’t. I don’t mention brands much, but in this case I have to give credit to Biofair for their quinoa flour, it’s much better than the previous brand I tried. Just be careful and be sure it’s a Gluten Free version you’re using, it’s marked on the pack so it’s hard to mistake. I’m glad I didn’t have to toast it as I’ve heard it can help with bitterness, but I’ve never tried it. It’d have made this more time consuming than I’d have liked so I was glad to skip that step.

 photo IMGP3948_e_zpscm2foztx.jpgThen sliced while still steaming. That’s  a sign of a fairly good loaf.

So what did we end up with when it was sliced up? A lovely yellow loaf that was slightly crusty on the outside and had a firm, but spongy inside. A loaf that when cut hot barely left any crumbs. I’ve never managed to get my Buckwheat Bread this soft even with the addition of flaxseed for some of the flour. I can see this being great for soft sandwiches, it may even toast well as it’s really light and airy. I’m going to freeze this up and have it over time. I think that’s all I can say about this loaf. I’m really pleased with how it turned out and as far as the basic loaf recipes goes I don’t foresee a need to change it again. Just remember brands of flour can yield different results and it’s rare one flour can sub for another, although you’ll be told otherwise much too often. This is simple baking, but it’s versatile and healthy, just what I like. Now, I’ll update the old recipe and post the new one here too. Until later.

 photo IMGP3946_e_zpsvezs1plb.jpgIt has a crust, I don’t know why or how, but it looks nice doesn’t it? Crusts are really rare.

Ingredients

200g Quinoa Flour
25g Ground Flaxseed
200ml Water
2 Tbsp Olive Oil
2 Large Eggs
1/3 Tbsp Baking Soda
Pinch of Salt

Makes one loaf.
Can be frozen.

Method

1. Preheat oven to 175c (No Fan).

2. Grease (With Butter or Olive Oil) and line a 6×3 inch loaf pan.

3. In a large bowl mix together the Egg, Olive Oil and Salt. Add the Quinoa Flour, Flaxseed and Baking Soda and stir until combined, then add the Water and stir together until smooth. Rest for 5 minutes until batter has thickened. It will still be stirrable.

4. Pour batter into prepared tin and bake for 45-60 minutes, turning halfway if needed, until golden brown and a skewer comes out clean.

5. Cool in tin for 20 minutes, then remove and let cool completely on a wire-rack.

Quinoa Flour and Yoghurt Flatbreads

Flatbreads and Korma. That’s a thing, right? Yeah, sure it is. It’s been a while since I even espied a takeaway.

You know what funny, and by funny I mean depressing, is the fallacy that weight-loss is only possible through starvation and how prevalent and ingrained that idea has become. You’ve seen what I eat, how I eat and I like to think I’ve shared a little of my philosophy throughout these posts. I’m over a year stable after massive weight-loss and still hold steady so take my word on that basis. Starvation, small portions and deprivation are short-term measures for weight-loss, but the damage they can do is long-term. Every time someone sees how I eat they can’t accept it, they think there’s some trick and that’s a horrible way to run a world. We’ve got to learn about portion control, nutritional value and individual needs as every body is different, in both meanings of the word body. What I need to fuel myself isn’t going to suit you and what you need won’t probably help me. I see so many Celiacs and other allergy and intolerance sufferers making basic mistakes and I just want to shout at them, but I know that’s not the right way. All I can do is share recipes, a few thoughts here and there and even, when feeling I won’t do any harm with it, some advice. This is apropos of nothing, but I just felt like getting it off my chest. Remember we’re all students of life, until the day we shuffle off this mortal coil we can change and grow and learn and pull our heads out of the sand. Sure it’s embarrassing to own up to the fact that we know near nothing about something as basic as food and nutrition, but once you get over that you find there’s a world out there yet unexplored and a you that has yet to be, a better, perhaps happier, healthier you. Anyway, onto the flatbread.

Yeah, this is still a food blog. You’ll forgive a bit of a ramble, right? Get back here!

These are halved and slightly tweaked from: Please Pass the Recipe. I keep seeing how quinoa flour tortillas and flatbreads are supposed to be flexible, but I have yet experience it myself. These actually do bend slightly more than I’ve seen, but I did use low-fat yoghurt so maybe full would have been better. It could also be the flour itself, as you may or may not know there can be worlds of difference between different brands of free-from flours. In all honesty I didn’t mind if these were  bendable, I just like the idea of an all quinoa flour flat bread and I was curious to see if it would work like Buckwheat and Yoghurt did, it wasn’t quite the same, but I liked the taste nonetheless. They had a soft texture and the quinoa flavour wasn’t that strong. The blistering does seem to impart something to the taste, hard to say what, but it was enjoyable. I did have to roll these out between greaseproof again as they kept tearing. That’s really all there is to say, a nice flatbread on the whole and one I can’t really find fault with. This is my sixth quinoa flour recipe, I have about two others left to try and that’ll finish the two small bags. Okay, that’s it for now, thanks for reading and take care.

Ingredients

50g Quinoa Flour
35g Low Fat Natural Yoghurt
1 Tbsp Warm Water
1 Tsp Olive Oil
Pinch Salt

Makes Three Small Flatbreads.

Method

1. Add dry ingredients to a bowl. In a separate bowl mix together the remaining ingredients and stir into the Flour with a fork until everything has combined. Knead the mixture, adding a dash of Water as needed, until a sticky dough has been formed. Form Dough into a ball and cover in cling-film and leave in the fridge for half an hour. Dough will be firm to the touch, but very sticky when worked.

3. Split the dough into three parts and roll out, between two sheets of greaseproof paper, into rough fairly thin circles. Handle carefully when transferring to the pan.

4. Heat some Oil in a pan and on a high heat cook the Flatbread for until browned and blistered then flip and do the same for the other side. Repeat for all Flatbreads. Brush with Olive Oil when cooked.

Quinoa Flour Bread

2017 Update: Due to a problem with Photobucket, see here, there will be a lot of recipes without photos. I will be slowly redoing the recipe pages, as best I can, but many other posts will be impossible to replace. I’m doing this in my own time, while continuing to update the blog with new recipes and posts. If you’d like to donate, any amount appreciated, you can do so here. The site will always be free, the recipes will never be locked behind a paywall, but this is a lot of additional work. I’m not demanding or begging, just putting it there so if you feel like repaying my hard work you have that option. I don’t make any money from the site, all that I do here is to help others, I couldn’t charge for that.

There’s a slight yellowness to the inside. Depends on the brand of flour, but yellow seems to be a good sign.

The greatest of my recipes for fried bread or as French Toast.

24 December 2015: Recipe has been updated. Read about it here. Recipe below is updated version.


A recipe starting with a caveat? Well that’s promising. Don’t worry, but do read the first paragraph before jumping to the recipe, please.

I know that I’m making this more than it needed to be, but I understand the cost of ingredients and have been burned by other’s carelessness so I’d rather be the a fuddle-duddy and be cautious. Firstly you can tell this recipe is just a tweak of my Buckwheat Flour Bread recipe, you see I want to make the most of what little quinoa flour I have and I couldn’t think of anything better than a bread with so many possibilities. Now here’s the heads up, the bread I baked is half of what the recipe states, but it has been baked in a small tin that’ll give the same result as a larger loaf as they both have the same height and as any bread baker knows the centre of the bread can be the most hazardous and if that fails the loaf is in trouble. So basically I can fairly safely say that baking this with a full recipe should be fine, but as I haven’t tried it I did want to warn anyone who was curious about trying it. It cut fine and held together pretty well, it is softer than the buckwheat and it did have more of a crumb to it. I used a medium egg in this small version and that’s why I recommend two in the full recipe, better for the stability of the loaf. Now when all is said and done you’ll probably be fine making a big loaf, which will be slightly flatter and probably hold better, and maybe even trying a few variations, but I couldn’t post this recipe without having my say. Now onto the recipe proper.

Now hopefully I haven’t scared anyone away. As far as the bread goes it isn’t bad, its strong taste is slightly off putting, but it’s something when a few other ingredients, maybe dried fruit, have been added would be much nicer. It’s texture is more spongy than say my Quinoa Flour Soda Bread and it has a slightly crumbly exterior, but no crust sadly. Really, there isn’t much to say about it, I’d probably call it a basic bread or even a base bread. Something that will benefit from additions, but that can still be eaten as is. This is the first of my Quinoa Flour recipes, I have 560g worth of flour and you know things are serious when you count the grams of flour. I hope to find recipes that open up further possibilities rather than one trick ponies, also recipes that make the most of the flour’s unique properties rather than bundling it with other and disguising it. So that’s it for today, a simple recipe that may come in handy. It’s certainly better than the amaranth bread I made once as a test, the less said about that sticky mess the better. Until next time.

Maybe we’ll see a variety of different tweaks for this bread or maybe it’ll stay as is and help someone someday. Who knows?

Ingredients

200g Quinoa Flour
25g Ground Flaxseed
200ml Water
2 Tbsp Olive Oil
2 Large Eggs
1/3 Tbsp Baking Soda
Pinch of Salt

Optional: Sprinkle Sesame Seeds over just before baking.

Makes one loaf.
Can be frozen.
Works wonderfully for fried bread.

Method

1. Preheat oven to 175c (No Fan).

2. Grease (With Butter or Olive Oil) and line a 6×3 inch loaf pan.

3. In a large bowl mix together the Egg, Olive Oil and Salt. Add the Quinoa Flour, Flaxseed and Baking Soda and stir until combined, then add the Water and stir together until smooth. Rest for 5 minutes until batter has thickened. It will still be stirrable.

4. Pour batter into prepared tin and bake for 45-60 minutes, turning halfway if needed, until golden brown and a skewer comes out clean.

5. Cool in tin for 20 minutes, then remove and let cool completely on a wire-rack.

Rooibos Quinoa

Just a small update to my Quinoa recipe today. I used my Rooibos Jasmine Rice as a basis for this tweak. I just omitted the Parsley as I thought it’d be too strong in such a small amount of Quinoa, the rest of the recipe is essentially the same. It’s all on the Quinoa page alongside other variations. It’s a little bit sweet, from the Rooibos I assume, but it works well and it really fluffed up nicely. I think the fat in stock might have a slight effect on Quinoa, I know from experience that too much will stop it cooking properly or at all. I should make my own, but it’s just me eating this and that’d be a huge hassle. Stock Cubes for life!

One slightly tangential story before I sign off. I was stocking up on Quinoa like it was the end of the world, as usual, and someone who had helped me before, she’s the overseer of the free-from section from what I can tell, a very kind and courteous lady, started talking about how she had seen a program on television about quinoa and we got to talking about it for a few minutes. It was nice to be able to talk to someone about this. It sometimes feels like it’s just me against the world when it comes to this kind of food, I know it’s not, but it does feel good when I find a fellow free from foodie (Say that five times fast). Just a slightly desultory story, but one I thought might be worth sharing. That’s it for today, hopefully I’ll have something more exciting in future, or at least exciting as food can be. Exploding quinoa it is! Kidding…maybe.

A Magically Muddled Mess of Updates

One bit before we start: I admit to being a lurker rather than a participator. I’ll read through posts, but neglect to like them, admire great food photography, but leave it at that, I’ll always share links to original recipes, but feel abashed at leaving a comment. In short: I’m wowed by the blogs, so professional, each and every one, of everyone who has come to this site and I can’t thank you all enough for your support, whether it be a view, share or a like. I feel like I have no idea what I’m doing, but I’m getting my recipes out there and that’s all that matters for now. I can learn and looking at all these amazing blogs I have a lot of learn from. I’ll enjoy every minute of it. Okay we now return to our regularly scheduled blog post.

This is it. The big one. Don’t screw this up, kid. You can do it! Just check your notes and you’ll be fine.

Oh dear, oh dear…

Al-right, first things first. I decided to get over my irrational dread of dark tahini and give it a shot. It’s just unhulled tahini, somehow I came under the impression that it was more roasted for some reason. I decided to try it in the Tahini Bread recipe, which is oddly popular despite being oddball and really simple, still it beats letting it go to waste and it tastes just fine, and thankfully it worked well.

Looks lovely before it sinks, eh?

And it’s sun…wait, not it’s not as bad actually.

Apparently the dark tahini gives the bread a firmer texture. It’s also not as intense as the one made using hulled tahini. I wouldn’t call it a sandwich bread, but it certainly is a tastier version when using the dark and probably healthier to boot. I have yet to try it in a sauce, but I have high hopes it’ll be just fine.

A few short updates before the finally big one. I added some Quinoa to my Whole Grain Basmati, just 25g, and it wasn’t too bad. It was a tad firmer, but you could add some more water if you wanted. It was also really filling, I was shocked that a bit of quinoa in rice would add so much.

Shamefully I realised I never tried my Nightshade Free Curry Powder. That’s a rarity for me, I guess I took the recipe down and just forgot to try it out. Thankfully I’ve rectified that and I’m happy to say it’s just fine. I still prefer individual blends for each curry, but it never hurts to have a few blends written down (Or typed up as the case may be).

I tried adding an additional banana to my Nutty Banana Flax Bread (Just scroll down) and it worked well. Gives it a slightly moister texture, but I still wouldn’t class it as a banana bread, which suits me as I’m not a huge fan of banana bread. It’s a little softer outside too, but it still cuts just fine. You’ll get 12 big slices out of it.

The extra banana makes it shiner. Leave out the curry powder though!

Onwards! Oh, one more thing. If you tap the bottom of any of these breads, and most others too, and it sounds hollow that means it’s cooked. You should still skewer/knife test it too, but it’s great if you can’t cut it yourself to check.

Rooibos Soaked Sultanas?!

I just realised that I neglected to post the first treacle bread. The more traditional version with un-soaked fruit. Can you pretend you saw that first? Thanks. The variation, which came first strangely, is just like my Mother’s treacle (Or molasses) bread that I grew up eating. I tell you it was a real treat to be able to eat it again.

Brown muck! Huzzah! Take my word for it, it looks the same as the gluten version.

Add the reserved tea slowly or you’ll have too much liquid.

These two recipe have their own page here: Buckwheat Flour Treacle and Tea Bread. There are two versions, the main one is more time consuming and has a moist texture, whereas the quicker, traditional one is drier, but goes wonderfully with butter. I can’t decide which I like more. Nostalgia is battling with taste and either way I’m a winner.

Just like Momma used to make, er, still makes.

I’ve put down all you’ll need on the recipes pages, just know the main version can be a little trickier, but it’s still really simple. It’s nice to be able to share a real Irish, family recipe. This has been a fairly long and graphic, geddit? Because of all the photos? *Crickets*, and I hope it made sense. I had fun this week. When you have to cook and bake entirely for yourself with no breaks, no eating out or having someone else cook, it can be tough, but I like to use my time to try new things, if I have to make bread why not make something new and then share it with others, that way I get more value from the time I spend toiling in the kitchen. Okay I’ve had me moan and I’ll go and eat bread now.

The tea version.