Microwave Rice Flour Mug Cake

Rice flour always lumps. Doesn’t affect the end result.

How many mug cake recipes have I now, Dear Reader? No, really I can’t recall any more. It’s important that when posting recipes you actually know if they work, I could’ve easily just posted the original with the addendum of replace x flour with everything. I never do that, never have and never will. You deserve better recipes, more thorough and well tested. I just wanted something light and slightly sweet and thought I might as well see how rice flour fared in this recipe. Look, I’m not a fan of commercial gluten free bread, I still assert that altogether too much of it is just terrible in every regard, but I dislike ragging on people’s chosen foods, I know the feeling naturally, but I really can’t believe how bland rice flour is. It’s a complete absence of taste, texture and well, everything. Buckwheat might be strong, quinoa might be a little bitter, but they have character, they make unique breads. Really, it’s why rice flour is used in addition to starches to bulk up commercial breads, not to say there aren’t great recipes using it, there are I have some, but on it’s own with other bland ingredients it really shows it’s limits. Okay, that’s enough alienating my Rice Flour Readers. Rice is a firm favourite of mine, rice flour is a great flour for simple and flat recipes, but it will never be as worthwhile as the other flours.

Mug, bowl, your bare hand smashed through the microwave door, whatever works.

Look, I like quick recipes like this, for a long time I had no options like this. If I wanted a quick hit of sugary sweetness I’d have to make a big batch of cookies or a cake or do without. Rice flour is handy here because it’s cheap and you don’t need to worry about it having better uses. Diversity in recipes is probably one of the main reasons for my continued health success. If you get tired of what you’re eating or you’re not getting enough varied nutrition then you’ll suffer for it. I’m not here to preach good health or choices, I do that enough already. I’m just here to share a fluffy, more crumbly than usual, light mug cake. If you want something to ease a sugar craving this isn’t a bad way to do it, it’s light so it won’t fill you up and it doesn’t use that much sugar so you can adjust it however you like. Either adding sweetness via toppings or just tossing a shot of coffee over it for a little depth of flavour. Okay, that’s that, Dear Reader, the weather is dismal and depressing and I just want to go garden. I want to get lost out there for hours and the sunshine refuses to shine over Jack evermore. I’m just planning, hardening off rose cuttings that have rooted, one is for Naru’s one year anniversary, and, honestly, trying not to sink into dark thoughts about the wait for the surgeries. Someday, Dear Reader, I’ll be free from waiting, free to just garden and garden and occasionally bother you with posts. For now, well, we carry on carrying on. Until later, take care.

Fluffy, but more crumbly. Not that it matters as you’re eating it directly from he bowl.

Ingredients

45g Rice Flour (Brown and White Blend)
30g Butter
50ml Milk
15g Sugar
1/2 Tsp GF Baking Powder
Dash Vanilla Extract

Method

1. Melt the Butter, in a mug, on a low heat and when cooled slightly mix in the Sugar and Vanilla Extract, with a fork, until dissolved.

2. Add in the the Buckwheat Flour and Baking Powder and mix until mixed, then finally add the Milk and and stir until everything has combined.

3. Microwave on full heat for 2 1/2 minutes. Cake should be dry and springy to the touch. Let cool for a few minutes before serving.

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Microwave Quinoa Mug Cake

Yes, I know that’s a bowl.

Dear Reader there are two types of microwave cakes. These are, of course, the Stay-ins and the Fall-outs, the former are these mug cakes made without egg, the latter are made with eggs and are more akin to bread. They’re all under the microwave tag so have a look. There are breads that are better than some loaves I’ve made in those recipes. These are al based on a recipe for a commercial mug cake that I took one look at and smugly proclaimed that I could make that. Three different flours later and it’s turns out I was right. Buckwheat, Sorghum and the ultimate flour for light and airy goods: Quinoa.

It’s so fluffy.

Therein lies the saddest part of quinoa’s lack of structural integrity: It would make amazing cakes, but they’d fall apart if made this light. Though, I will contradict myself and say that the egg version of the microwave cakes is very similar to sponge, but not very cake like. That’s where the mug, bowl whatever, comes in. Since there’s no need to take it out you can add more to give it a light crumb. The butter and sugar here are the key elements. You might have to up the sugar, or do like I do and top it with a loose icing, if your quinoa flour is very strong. There isn’t much to this, but it tastes just so light and sweet. It’s a great way to have a treat without going all out. It just crumbles away, but isn’t at all dry. I’m not sure if this is unique to the site or if anyone else is making these like this. The recipe is my own creation so if nothing else you have a guarantee I will try it with as many flours as I deem suitable. That’s it for now, Dear Reader. See you again soon.

It stays hot for a long time.

Ingredients

45g Quinoa Flour
30g Butter
65ml Milk
15g Sugar
1/2 Tsp GF Baking Powder
Dash Vanilla Extract

Method

1. Melt the Butter, in a mug, on a low heat and when cooled slightly mix in the Sugar, with a fork, until dissolved.

2. Add in the Milk and Vanilla Extract and stir until everything has combined. Finaly add in the Quinoa Flour and Baking Powder and mix until smooth.

3. Microwave on full heat for 2 1/2 to 3 minutes. Cake should be dry and springy to the touch. Let cool for a few minutes before serving.

Breads Here Revisited Part 3: Microwave Breads

Now, I know, some of these are cakes, but I make most of these without the sugar, with a little salt and they make the best quick breads. There are a lot of “mug cakes”, which I do have recipes for as well, but I think of the difference thus: A mug cake is eaten from the mug, whereas the bread is removed from the baking vessel. Now I know that seems a trifle pedantic, but what makes these work so well as bread is that they can be sliced. So, let’s think of them as breads and see what we can see, shall we, dear reader?

Microwave Amaranth Flour Bread
Microwave Banana Flour Cake
Microwave Buckwheat and Rice Flour Cake
Microwave Buckwheat Cake
Microwave English Muffin
Microwave Flax Muffin
Microwave Quinoa Flour Cake
Microwave Rice Flour Cake
Microwave Sorghum Flour Bread

You could be a pain and question whether these are breads and you can feel free to do so. I’m calling them breads and phooey from me to you! What I love about these is that they take very little in the way of specialised ingredients, the ground flaxseed might not be so common, ground chia works too, but other than that it’s pretty basic. The recipes themselves feature numerous options, covering so many diets. The only catch is the egg is necessary for the texture and rise, the original recipe used banana if I’m not mistaken, but it was more of a cake, there are cakes in these too, but for this post I’ll focus on the bread. And, yes, this started as a single recipe that I adapted from another. It uses a total of eight (We’ll count flaxseed as a flour, shush) different flours. I’ve found success with so many, barring ground almonds, too fatty I think, so I can only imagine any free from flour would work here. This recipe is great for using up the dregs of flour as it uses so little. You can easily mix and match as needed. When made using only a single flour it really highlights the unique taste and texture of that flour. I usually make these in a jug ad they just pop right out so there isn’t much clean up.

To talk at length about such mundane things is a gift, dear reader. What you have here is the closest thing to a free-from sandwich bread, no crust sadly, but you can’t have everything, without using gums or added starches. They come out springy, light, different flours yield slightly varying results, but it’s pretty consistent across the board. The reason they come out so light is because of the egg swelling, reacting to the baking powder too I assume, and setting before it can fall. The flax and flour help to stabilise. There isn’t an eggy taste as you’d imagine as the egg is well cooked through when the bread is ready. This is great for making a quick meal, spread on the nut butters and jams or slather sauce and spiced meat and eat it open-faced. It’s filling, again varying on the flour used, and you’ll find you don’t need a whole lot to make it a meal. They’re best eaten on the day, but you could probably freeze them.

So, there you have it. I would have scoffed at a microwave bread if I hadn’t scarfed so many in my time. Many a time I forgot to leave out something for tea and found myself hungry and in no mood to get cooking. A quick mix up in a jug and there it is: Bread! I like recipes like these, they’re almost foolproof and if you find yourself with a free-from flour that’s lacking in uses you can try something like these and you’ll be almost guaranteed success. I primarily make them with rice flour as it’s the cheapest and least versatile flour in my cupboard. I have found sorghum delicious and wonderfully light. Quinoa works best for a cake and banana flour is slightly revolting if I’m honest.

You’ll notice that the breads I use often are pretty easy to prepare, that’s hardly surprising. I’ve lost count of how many loaves I’ve made over the years. The ease of making them has helped me stick to my diet. The variety has kept me from getting bored and fed up. I hope you’ll find something to interest you in this series, dear reader. There are other breads on the site and maybe they’ll suit you better. The reason I started this series was to showcase a few recipes and to encourage people to look at the recipe page, there are so many recipes that are sadly under-loved. Perhaps if this is popular enough there’ll be another series of posts using those recipes. I’ll see you again next time, dear reader.

Microwave Sorghum Flour Mug Cake

2017 Update: Due to a problem with Photobucket, see here, there will be a lot of recipes without photos. I will be slowly redoing the recipe pages, as best I can, but many other posts will be impossible to replace. I’m doing this in my own time, while continuing to update the blog with new recipes and posts. If you’d like to donate, any amount appreciated, you can do so here. The site will always be free, the recipes will never be locked behind a paywall, but this is a lot of additional work. I’m not demanding or begging, just putting it there so if you feel like repaying my hard work you have that option. I don’t make any money from the site, all that I do here is to help others, I couldn’t charge for that.

 

Nope, that was bread. This is cake and eggless.

I wish I had something exciting to report on sorghum flour, dear reader, but it’s not doing anything spectacular, I’m afraid. I’m at the stage that I think I could reasonably use any free-from flour and find enough recipes to make it worthwhile having it in your pantry, if you’re fancy, or press, if you’re normal. It’s amazing to think how much can be accomplished if you doggedly stick to something. I’ve never given up on making single-use recipes work without gums or added starches. It’s become my style I suppose. I would say whenever I see a recipe claiming the need for this or that additional ingredients that it makes me angry, but I’m just too weary for that. I instead carry on as I am knowing what can be done with just a few ingredients ad will always be looking for kindred bloggers. I don’t think it makes me better, just different and different in this kind of way means that more people are being catered for. Being nightshade intolerant in a gluten free space meant I was continuously forced to adapt recipes and fight all the harder just to find them in the first place. Add starch free, well just forget it. Then a time came when I just started looking after myself. I now have recipes that can be used as templates and can be changed and adapted thanks to the knowledge I have obtained. All this preamble for a basic mug recipe? You know me, dear reader, you wouldn’t change me for the world.

Don’t eat it hot! *Burns tongue again eating it hot*

So, while I’m waiting on my basil to grow a bit more before harvesting I may as well say a bit about this mug ca…hmm? You mean to tell me that the world isn’t divided into the moments awaiting basil and harvesting basil? That’s absurd! All our waking days are purposeful because we all strive for basil! The moments without are the price we pay for the wondrous moments wherein we have basil. Seriously, I’m very close to harvest and thanks to the greenhouse it’s looking as if all the varieties will survive without much worry. I won’t count on the Dark Opal until it’s large enough, but it looks to be forging ahead. As for the cake. Let’s think. I think perhaps it needs a bit more sugar, though you can always add something sweet to top it off after cooking. I really like the taste of the sorghum and it adds a wonderfully light crumb. The cake really does crumble as you fork your way through, each morsel is a delicate, spongy delight. In truth, arrogant as all out, but who reads this far? I can say anything!, it’s better than the commercial version I used as a rough idea. Not that I ate it, but I can tell, dense and dry, not for me. Mine is richer, lighter and much more free-from. You know what has been bugging me is the idea that gluten free baking is naturally inferior and that only a choice few can really rise above the mediocrity. In truth I think too many people consume commercial products without ever tasting home-made and they also only try gluten free products with way too many additions and the best part is that a lot of wheat based commercial products now use gums and starches like their gluten free counterparts. Good food is good food regardless of the dietary labels, right, Dear Reader? I think if given a different path in life I may have tried my hand at being a professional baker. Perhaps even a pastry chef. For this life I will be Jack. That’ll do, right, dear reader?

Ingredients

45g Sorghum Flour
30g Butter
50ml Milk
15g Sugar
1/2 Tsp GF Baking Powder
Dash Vanilla Extract

Method

1. Melt the Butter, in a mug, on a low heat and when cooled slightly mix in the Sugar, with a fork, until dissolved.

2. Add in the Milk and Vanilla Extract and stir until everything has combined. Finally add in the Sorghum Flour and Baking Powder and mix until smooth.

3. Microwave on full heat for 2 minutes. Cake should be dry and springy to the touch. Let cool for a few minutes before serving.

Microwave Sorghum Flour Bread

2017 Update: Due to a problem with Photobucket, see here, there will be a lot of recipes without photos. I will be slowly redoing the recipe pages, as best I can, but many other posts will be impossible to replace. I’m doing this in my own time, while continuing to update the blog with new recipes and posts. If you’d like to donate, any amount appreciated, you can do so here. The site will always be free, the recipes will never be locked behind a paywall, but this is a lot of additional work. I’m not demanding or begging, just putting it there so if you feel like repaying my hard work you have that option. I don’t make any money from the site, all that I do here is to help others, I couldn’t charge for that.

A fresh, steaming bun from the microwave. It really shouldn’t be great, but it is.

May 17th Update: They cancelled my surgery. Now I have to wait, again. I have no idea when it’ll happen now. I don’t know when the blog will resume, bear with me, dear reader.

This post was typed on the 13th of May.

Ah, dear reader. I’m probably going to have a few deferred posts. My head just isn’t in a place to respond to comments and deal with the blog right now. I’m getting ready for my surgery and hospital stay and you can imagine how stressful that is. Still, I’ve often said that here’s catharsis in writing and since I have a new flour to divert my focus I might as well make use of both these things. So, these posts will be written now, posted later and this whole paragraph might be pointless. I won’t mention the hospital or surgery much, it’s very stressful. I need to prepare meals to be brought up that can eaten cold, I have already done that, that might be a guide in the future, let’s see how I’ll be after all this. I also want some  dinners, breads etc left in for the after. I’m all I have when it comes to food preparation, dear reader, and right now I’m close to burning out. I’ll be okay, Jack is tough.

This one really resembles a burger-bun.

So, sorghum. It’s apparently a grain, for real this time. No pseudo about it. I bought a small bag of flour to test it out. Sadly the first trial was for a simple loaf and it stuck like crazy. I might revisit that, but I’d rather make use of it’s strengths as a single use flour than spend time trying to cover for its weaknesses. Now the second, almost foolproof, recipe is a success as you can see. I love these microwave breads, each flour imparts a different texture and taste, but the main result is almost universal. A soft, bouncy bread that only a takes a few minutes to prepare. Thank the egg for that. How does the sorghum fare? Really well actually, it had a firm texture while still being soft and springy. It’s the closest to a burger-bun I’ve reached. As for taste there isn’t much of note, it’s earthy in the way a lot of these alternative grains and seeds are, but it’s pretty mild compared to quinoa or amaranth. I should also say I always use a microwave-safe jug for these recipes and I never bother greasing it, but you can if you’d rather.

Fresh lettuce from the garden.

Sorghum seems similar to amaranth in that it doesn’t soak up much liquid, but like quinoa it can go into the oven runny and come out firm and springy. I’d say texture-wise it resembles buckwheat, there’s a slight dryness to it, but not as pronounced as buckwheat. It’s somewhere between buckwheat and quinoa. Which isn’t very help, is it? Not if you lack experience with these flours. So, okay, it doesn’t absorb liquid, but it can still bake well even when runny, but less liquid seems best. This is all as a single use, by the way. I haven’t tested it much yet as far as stability and strength goes, keep an eye out in the future for that. As for texture, it’s bouncy, but not rubbery, there’s a slight dryness there, pleasant though. I see this working well to balance drier flours or where a more spongy texture is needed. I didn’t find much taste, that might change in other recipes, but I have to learn this from scratch myself first before I can teach anyone else.

So, that’s that. I have five hundred grams to play with and a lot of recipes that will push the flour to it’s limit. The blog will eventually return to normal, but for now this is the way it’ll go. I hope when I finally publish this I’ll be recovering and happy with the results. It’s been a long journey, the last few steps I need help with, all the rest I’ve handled alone. See you again soon, dear reader.

Ingredients

45g Sorghum Flour
7g Ground Flaxseed (1 Tbsp)
1 Tsp GF Baking Powder
1 Large Egg
50ml Water
Pinch Salt

Method

1. Grease microwave safe bowl with Butter or Oil.

2. Whisk together the Egg, Water and Salt. Then Whisk in the Flour, Flax and Baking Powder. Batter will be smooth. Pour into greased bowl.

3. Cook on full heat for 3 minutes. Cake should be springy to the touch and will just about double in size. Place plate on top of the bowl and turn out. Let cool slightly and serve.

Microwave Quinoa Flour Mug Cake

 photo WP_20170423_002_e_zpsferbp6iz.jpgThis is silly amounts of work for a microwave cake, but it’s good.

Okay, first things first, dear reader. Though brain and I reached a worthwhile consensus on the procurement of cake, brain decided that we should shove the mixture into a single mug and yeah, don’t do that. Either make it two or make it a jug cake. You can share it your significant other, random strangers or you could eat it all. I won’t judge if you won’t.

 photo WP_20170423_003_e_zpslse8ikif.jpg“Not the garlic spatula, right?”…Er, sure.

So, you ever watchful reader, you say it’s just this, but no flaxseed, but what about this? Nope, it uses an egg. A separated egg no less, how very fancy. Not so much when it spills over, but still worthwhile, just make two and don’t follow in my erroneous footsteps. Now, what’s the difference here and in those others. Well, er, quinoa flour is much lighter than buckwheat, it imparts an airy lightness that’s hard to match. Though it lacks hold the egg makes up for that while also supplementing its light texture with the beaten whites. Without the flax you lose that slight rubbery feel, though you also lose the ability to remove it from the mug. I just wanted to use the qualities of the flour to the best of my ability.

 photo WP_20170423_004_e_zpsfy39hnmx.jpgDon’t do it, dear reader.

I also just wanted a lazy, decadent cake. A dissolute delicious dish…er, mug. It’s nice to have a small bit of something sweet and not have to make a big batch, I might have once scoffed at the idea of microwave cakes, but I’m now firmly planted in he pro-cake camp. There’s a real satisfaction in being able to quickly whip up a cake that can even be eaten plain with feeling that its lacking. A quick recipe and with it I’ll leave you. Where am I off to? Why to glare at butterflies! They’ve appeared early, just as my cabbage was planted. Which is now under netting. They won’t catch Jack sleeping and if he catches them, well, that’s another story. Until later, dear readers.

 photo WP_20170423_006_e_zpsvgdbs7b1.jpgNo, no, it’s not a mistake. It’s one of those Pinterest photos where it spills over artistically…yeah.

Ingredients

1 Large Egg (65-75g in Shell) Separated
50g Quinoa Flour
30g Butter, Melted and Cooled
50ml Milk
30g Sugar
1/2 Tsp GF Baking Powder
Dash Vanilla Extract

Makes two servings or one large.

Method

1. Beat, with an electric mixer, the Egg White until stiff peaks form and set aside.

2. Add everything but the Flour and Baking Powder to a jug and beat until smooth. Add in the Flour and Baking Powder and beat until a thick smooth batter has been formed. Finally gently fold in the Egg White until just combined.

3. Microwave on full heat for 2 1/2 to 3 minutes. Cake should be dry and springy to the touch. Let cool for a few minutes before serving.

Microwave Buckwheat Mug Cake

 photo WP_20170407_005_e_zps5qnzz4hb.jpgCake makes me happy. As do you, dear reader. Just not as much as cake.

Hello, dear reader. I love when a simple recipe, crafted on the spur of the moment, actually succeeds. This was inspired, perhaps spitefully, by a boxed mug cake mix. I looked at the ingredients, the necessary additions and thought: I could do that. Though the original was chocolate and I can’t do, or eat rather, that. Mug cakes are a dime a dozen, this probably isn’t all that different from the norm. It’s egg-less which marks it as different from my usual microwave cakes. It’s also smaller, lighter, fluffier and doesn’t come out of the mug. Funnily though the boxed version is wheat based it still uses xanthan gum, as does everything these days or so it feels. No gum for me, I don’t need it and can’t tolerate it. Give me buckwheat and I’ll find a way to replicate most recipes in time.

 photo WP_20170407_009_e_zpscklokdyh.jpgYou also react violently when stabbed with a fork.

So, the egg-ectomy changes this…What? That was an An egg-cellent yolk! I crack me up, dear reader. Okay, I’ll stop. It’s much less filling than the others, it also has a lighter texture and because of that it’s more crumbly. It’s a fair trade off for a lighter cake since you won’t be removing it from the mug. You could whip up some caramel sauce, in the microwave too, to top the cake with, I just used a little maple syrup. It killed a craving for something sweet. It’s often funny what recipes cause people to comment, it’s always pleasant to see a comment, a report of success is especially gratifying, on a little loved recipe. So, that’s it, just a quick recipe. Now, to pass it over to me and bend our ear about plants.

 photo WP_20170407_001_e_zpsogcpc6ul.jpgWatching the Shirley Tulips slowly colour is really interesting.

I think the greenhouse is giving the plants a better chance, even with drops in temperature after warm spells they seem to be doing just fine. I’m happy to report that the first Table King Squash seed has germinated. I have five or so harlequin, but I was unsure of the viability of the table king seeds in colder weather. The only problem I have is that winter squash seems to be little known and not often grown around here. So I have only myself and the world wide web to consult. I know more each year and therein lies the problem. What problem? The unbearable smugness of Jack The Squash King! All hail me! Preventer of root binding! Deterer of powder mildew! Seriously, I would love to see more people growing and enjoying Winter Squash. If you ever visit Jack’s garden I will give you a winter squash plant! For only Nineteen ninety nine! Free? Don’t be silly, dear reader. Jack needs the money to buy more plants.

 photo WP_20170407_003_e_zpsldcwk92e.jpgI can quit whenever I…COMPOST!

I think that every gardener faces the disappointment of cuttings failing to take root. It’s a great way to get different plants, but success seems to be mostly up to luck. I seem to have hit a lucky spell, dear reader. I have a large rose plant, that was merely a nub from a red rose and a Hydrangea, more still growing too. I couldn’t believe the root the rose had, it was really large. I of course added sugar water to them, so that that droop will be gone in a day, if not already and gave them plenty of rose and shrub feed pellets. I leave them to look after themselves when cut, but once they prove they’ll grow I take as much care and attention as possible. I even bought colourant for the hydrangea, well, for the large established plant in the front garden. Blue flowers, wouldn’t that be fun? See you again.

Ingredients

45g Buckwheat Flour (6 Tbsp)
30g Butter
50ml Milk
15g Sugar
1/2 Tsp GF Baking Powder
Dash Vanilla Extract

Method

1. Melt the Butter, in a mug, on a low heat and when cooled slightly mix in the Sugar, with a fork, until dissolved.

2. Add in the Milk and Vanilla Extract and stir until everything has combined. Finaly add in the Buckwheat Flour and Baking Powder and mix until smooth.

3. Microwave on full heat for 2 1/2 to 3 minutes. Cake should be dry and springy to the touch. Let cool for a few minutes before serving.