Buckwheat and Harlequin Squash Gnocchi

 photo WP_20160731_003_e_zps8hbdhct6.jpgI only noticed the blue hue when it was too late. It’s really not that blue. It actually has a lovely tinge of yellow.

Told you I’d be back with another post. Let’s be frank here, no not both of us, you’ll just be dear reader, as Frank I can admit that I’m forgetful. So it’s better to type this up while it’s still relatively fresh in my mind. So, right posts about pasta. I was harvesting more peas. No, I’m joking, I’m not that bad. I have been, as you may know if you’ve perused my previous post, making use of my second squash. I generally get about 350g of flesh out of each one and a half pound squash. Nearer two pound, but that’s neither here nor there. I want to make use of the squash, but I also want to enjoy it’s uniqueness and celebrate it’s taste and texture. So I had my sautéed squash and then I set my sights on something new-ish. You, again maybe you’re new, may know my Buckwheat and Sweet Potato Gnocchi, which also uses squash, but orange fleshed varieties, that’s what this is based on. You see as I’ve said before, I’m repeating that a lot, aren’t I?, bad writing, harlequin is in texture like a potato, so close it scares me sometimes. Nothing this wonderful can be good for you. Oh, but it is. So I thought I should try it in a recipe that usually uses potato. In doing so I’ve had to change the recipe slightly. It uses less now than the original and it does use an egg, sorry egg-free readers, but I don’t see why a flax-egg shouldn’t be as effective. I won’t list that until I try it for myself. So take it with that caveat. No, not a cravat. You can’t just go taking people’s cravats. And stop calling me Frank!

 photo WP_20160731_005_e_zpsbr5qw1ya.jpgSomeday I’ll be more serious and less irreverent. Oh, wait, no I won’t. *Cocks a snook*

Okay, what changed. Well, I used less flour to start, didn’t even require any when kneading it on a work-surface. The harlequin isn’t very watery, it’s like a potato in that regard too. Flaky when steamed. Oh, so good. Sorry, getting distracted by it’s majesty. I also used a slightly smaller egg as there was less need for binding, though a large might not have much difference. It does crack slightly when worked, just keep smushing it and it’ll come back together. It takes less time overall as you only need a few minutes to steam rather than the few hours it usually takes to roast. I went with balls just because the mood struck me. This is hardly traditional gnocchi so the skies the limit when it comes to variations. I did eat this too, I just boiled one piece to test it. It’s a bit lighter, similar to the carob gnocchi, it has a slight taste from the squash, a pleasant taste, but still one that a sauce will cover. I like that these are airer than the usual buckwheat gnocchi. It was worth taking a chance. The next few squash will probably be saved for cottage pie topping. I’m looking at some potato recipes to see if there’s anything unique I could try. I’ll keep you abreast of developments in that regard.

 photo WP_20160731_008_e_zpsyiygewft.jpgMy stained planters, well, soon to be planters. They need a lining and drainage holes. When the potatoes come up these go down.

 photo WP_20160731_009_e_zpszstv6nti.jpgI also have a red watering can now. One fills from the tapped barrel while I run amok  with the other. My broad beans have finished, the mystery squash was a yellow squash and it’s now compost. Jack is kept busy.

Ingredients

200g Buckwheat Flour
180-200g Harlequin Squash, Cubed
1 Medium Egg (60g in Shell)
1/2 Tsp Salt

Makes about 5 85g Servings.
Can be frozen.
Cook from Frozen.

Method

1. Steam Harlequin until soft and flaky, but not mushy. Mash with a fork in a bowl, cover with a tea towel and set aside.

2. Add Flour, Salt and Egg to the Harlequin and stir together with a fork until everything is mixed. Start to bring together by hand while still in the bowl until a firm dough is formed and then place on a working surface and start to knead until dough is no longer crumbly. Will take quite a bit of kneading. Dough may still crack, but should reform when worked. Shouldn’t need extra flour.

4. Using a Teaspoon scoop up some of the dough and roll into a ball, smoothing as needed, press with a fork if desired, and set aside, repeat until all dough is used up. Freeze on a greaseproof lined tray if not using right away.

5. When cooking bring a large pot of water to the boil and add at most a dozen Gnocchi at a time, when they float to the top they are done, about 5-7 minutes. Use a slotted spoon to remove the Gnocchi.

Advertisements

One thought on “Buckwheat and Harlequin Squash Gnocchi

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s