Chia Egg and Buckwheat Flour Five Months In

Give or take. Just a quick post, this is one of those failure posts. Well, it’s only a slight failure. I was making a triple batch of Carob Soba Noodles and everything was fine and dandy, the noodles all held wonderfully, lovely long strands with no breaking. Then after I made them and was packing them they broke. I’m so ashamed, nah, not really, but it’s a shame. I of course tossed them away in disgust, by which I mean I swore at them, bagged them and popped them in the freezer. Pasta is pasta dear reader of mine, regardless of the shape it all tastes pretty similar. So, you might want to know what this is about. I don’t blame you.

Oh, you’re still here? Okay, then it’s actually something I noticed before when using chia egg as a binder in soba noodles: It tends to dry out fast and makes them brittle. So make them fresh. That’s it, Yup. But here’s the thing: I had to learn this from noting as this is my own creation. That’s a strange thing to say and it’s not out of a desire to be a braggart, more out of the desire to inform. I’m learning as I go and it can take a while to really tell why something goes awry. I don’t often make these noodles so it has taken me a long time to see the slight flaw in them. Cook them fresh and you’ll never have any trouble. Let’s face it, any free-from baking has a lot of stipulations attached to it, but having to make fresh noodles, which is better anyway, isn’t so bad.

So, what about the chia egg and the passage of time? Well, it’s been five months or so and this is still an amazing combination. The dough I made was re-worked five times and was perfect until it started to dry out. Now one warning is that it will take a lot of work kneading and smashing the dough when making soba with it. Say a good ten to fifteen minutes. With the pastry you have more moisture and that will make it vastly easier to work and re-work. Still, watching it form into a stretchy dough that could be rolled out wafer thin and cut into thin fold-able strips was a real joy. It’s so simple, but it works so well. Sure, today I ended up with broken strands but they’ll taste fine and I’ll have learned a little more about this technique. That’s what this is all about: Learning. You start from nothing when you enter the free-from scene and you’ll have plenty of opportunities to create new ideas as there’s a lot out there waiting to be created and discovered. Maybe chia egg and buckwheat flour isn’t a huge discovery, but being able to knead dough for Pastry, Soba and Tortillas that can be reworked, won’t crumble and will stretch and roll out super-thin is still marvellous to me. Maybe when I’m an even older hand at all this I’ll be slightly more jaded, but for now this is still really neat. Let’s hope I can do even more in the future. With all your support I know I’ll have the drive to keep at this. Thank you everyone who has checked out the site. It means a lot.

Bonus!

I wanted a wide slice of my Buckwheat and Flax Bread and thought I’d try an old trick. I split the batter into three 4 /12 spring-form pans and baked it as normal, alongside a full sized loaf, and it worked just great. You get about four slices worth in each, which for sandwiches is just ideal. It’s a simple idea, but not something I’ve done in a long time. You could make one whole loaf this way too, but I just wanted a couple of large thin slices for a sandwich. I’ll leave one out and freeze the others, then cut up the loaf and freeze that too. It freezes really well. Okay, that’s it for today. Until later.

 photo WP_20160425_008_e_zpsu9nbexbn.jpgOh, buckwheat. You do me good.

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4 thoughts on “Chia Egg and Buckwheat Flour Five Months In

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